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The Old Testament in 10 Minutes + the New Testament in 10 Minutes

from Justin Taylor

Jason Derouchie (who teaches Old Testament at Bethlehem College & Seminary and is the editor of the highly praised What the Old Testament Authors Really Cared About: A Survey of Jesus’ Bible [Kregel, 2013]) and Andy Naselli (who teaches NT and theology at Bethlehem College & Seminary and is co-author with D. A. Carson and Doug Moo of Introducing the New Testament: A Short Guide to Its History and Message [Zondervan, 2010]) walk through the whole Bible in 20 minutes.

View the Old Testament video by Jason Derouchie and the New Testament video by Andy Naselli here.

The scripts without the greetings and comments are for you to download:

The Old Testament in 10 Minutes

The New Testament in 10 Minutes

Are You About Through?

My wife, Margaret, and her sister were visiting a dear elderly and godly friend in the hospital.

As Margaret was reading Psalm 42 from the Word of God, suddenly the lady in the next bed said, “Are you about through? I don’t like that!”

The Word of God does that, doesn’t it? To some, it soothes, comforts, challenges, encourages, convicts and builds up. To others, the Word of God is a stinging sound!

Should we not read and use the Word of God more to let it do its work?

During my cancer treatment years ago, Margaret had to rush me to emergency one night. As the doctors worked on me through the night, not really knowing what to do, they called Margaret into the hall the next morning to explain my situation to her. About that time, a chaplain came in to see me and I thought “Oh no, this must be it.”

As the chaplain talked softly to me for a few minutes, I finally opened my eyes and as tactfully as I could in my pain said, “Is that the stuff you share with people all the time?” He said, “What do you mean?” I said, “Well I’m dying of cancer, I do not want to hear about the sweet breeze blowing through the trees, the smell of flowers or the birds chirping. I am dying! You need to read the Word of God.” He said, “The Word of God? Where do I get a copy?” I said, “For Pete’s sake, you are a chaplain! Get one of those Gideon Bibles over there on the table.” As he picked up the Bible he asked, “Where do I read?” I said, “Well, why don’t you start with Romans?” (I forgot that when you are dying you are supposed to read Psalms, not Romans). So he began to read Romans chapter one. In my pain I went to sleep just as he got to verse 16, “For I am not ashamed of the gospel, for it is the power of God for salvation to everyone who believes…” What a great verse to go to sleep on!

The next day, he came to see me again and asked “Can we read the Word of God some more?” As he read and we talked, I challenged him to use the Word with more patients because even in our misery, agony, pain and discomfort, the Word of God brings hope.

The Scripture says, “So faith comes from hearing, and hearing by the word of Christ” (Romans 10:17). So let’s read the Word of God and our faith will continue to grow.

What do We Believe about the Bible?

by Bill Mounce

There are four things that followers of Jesus believe about the Bible. I don’t have time to cover them in detail, but let me mention them and I’ll give you a website where you can learn more if you want.

This is really important material. The Bible wants to become your guide, and you have to decide whether you will believe it or not.

1. Inspiration

We believe that the Bible is “inspired.” This is not the idea that the Bible is inspiring, like a good novel or comic strip depending on your reading tastes. The Bible is inspiring, but that’s not the point. The doctrine of inspiration has to do with its source. Inspiration is the belief that the Bible came from the very mouth of God, that it contains his very words. Paul is encouraging his friend Timothy to persevere in his preaching, and writes this.

“All Scripture is breathed out by God and profitable for teaching, for reproof, for correction, and for training in righteousness, that the man of God may be competent, equipped for every good work” (2 Timothy 3:16-17, ESV).

“Breathed out” is a helpful translation. There was not a word in the Greek language to describe what Paul wanted to say, so Paul did what Greek allows him to do — he made up a word. He took the word “God” and the word “breathed” and put them together. Scripture is God-breathed; the words came from his very mouth.

Peter says the same thing using the imagery of being “carried along by the Holy Spirit.”

“No prophecy of Scripture came about by the prophet’s own interpretation of things. For prophecy never had its origin in the human will, but prophets, though human, spoke from God as they were carried along by the Holy Spirit” (2 Peter 1:20-21).

2. Authority

We believe in the “authority” of the Bible. Because the words come from God’s very mouth, they carry his authority. That is the flow of logic in Paul’s verse above. Because all of Scripture is breathed out by God, it is therefore profitable for teaching, reproof, correction, and for training a person in righteousness. This is how Timothy, the man of God, can be made competent, to be equipped to do his ministry.

3. Canonicity

We believe in the process of “canonicity.” This means we believe God superintended the process of the church deciding what books belong in the Bible. This process took place over 400 years, and we believe God’s Spirit made sure we got it right. The sixty-six books we have are the right ones, and all the other books that were left out deserved to be left out because God did not write them.

4. Trustworthy

We believe the Bible is “trustworthy.” This ultimately is the issue for us. Because we believe God is true, we also believe that his words are true and can be trusted. We believe the Bible we have today accurately records Jesus words and deeds, and that the later writers like Paul, and the earlier writers like Moses, got it right. And so we look to the Bible to hear God’s authoritative word delivered to us.

I am sorry to have covered these points so quickly, but it is important that you as a new follower be aware of them. If you want to learn more them, please visit the “Discipleship” link and then “Track 3,” and attend my “New Testament” class. There are 3-4 hours of my lectures on these four topics.

How the Bible Hangs Together

by Don Carson

We Christians believe that the Bible is 66 books; we also believe the Bible is but one book. We believe this Bible embraces both the Old and New Testaments; we believe there is but one huge plot, one storyline. Yet those of us who teach and preach the Bible regularly admit that sometimes we do not do a good job showing how the entire Bible hangs together. In particular, we would often like some help on how better to preach the Old Testament. Certain snippets we manage reasonably well—Genesis 12, perhaps, plus 2 Samuel 7, Psalm 23, Isaiah 53, and so forth. But much of the Old Testament we ignore in the pulpit. To compound the challenge, when we observe how the New Testament handles the Old, we sometimes wonder what is going on, and how much of the New Testament handling of the Old ought to be reproducible in our handling of the Old.

Some elements of the challenge are reasonably straightforward. First, there is one God, the same God, entirely self-consistent. However diverse the ways of depicting him—in praise, narrative, apocalyptic imagery, events that vary from terrifying (Sinai) to sheer pathos (Hosea), working above history, disclosing himself in history and supremely in his Son—there is but one God. And second, this one God works all things out across the span of redemptive history in one huge story, for his own glory and for his people’s good. So as we study Scripture, we will be on the right track if we are able to tie things to that one story and to the purposes of this one God.

Nevertheless, although these twin mainstays of what some call “whole Bible biblical theology” are foundational for faithful preaching, there are plenty of challenges along the way. How does one responsibly move from, say, Numbers, or 1 Chronicles, or Psalm 45, or Song of Songs, or Jeremiah, or Obadiah, to Jesus and his gospel, in a way that is credible and without anachronism? We have all heard the dangers of preaching Old Testament narrative and biography in merely moralizing ways (though sometimes even the New Testament observes moral lessons in Old Testament narratives: see 1 Cor 10:1-13; Heb 3:7-19), but how does one leap to Jesus and the new covenant without sounding forced and artificial? All of us can track out some of the trajectories that run through the Bible: themes of priesthood, sacrifice, temple, Jerusalem, Davidic kingship, covenant, election, and more. But how do they work? How do they all converge in Jesus? At what point do they become forward-looking even within the pages of the Old Testament? And from the preacher’s point of view, is there help to be found to show how to herald such themes as these with power and unction, in a culture that has little place for temples, priests, kings, and covenants?

Some of the answers to such questions are found in good books and in courses well taught. We will try to identify some of those books and courses. But some of the answers are best learned by hearing preachers who handle the Word well. That explains why the plenary sessions of the 2011 national conference of The Gospel Coalition will focus on preaching Christ from the Old Testament. It also explains this project, which will continue long after the conference concludes in the hope of strengthening Christ-centered and faithful biblical preaching everywhere.

Bible Studies You Might Enjoy

Source: susancanthony.com; theoldtimegospel.org

Names of God

1.    Elohim, “Creator” (Gen 1:1)

2.    El-Elyon, “God Most High” (Gen 14:17-20)

3.    El-Olam, “Everlasting God” (Is 40:28-31)

4.    El-Roi, “Strong One Who Sees” (Gen 16:13)

5.    El-Shaddai, “God Almighty” (Gen 17:1)

6.    Adonai, “Lord Almighty” (Mal 1:6)

7.    Jehovah / YHWH (Gen 2:4)

8.    Jehovah-Jireh, “The Lord Will Provide” (Gen 22:14)

9.    Jehovah-Maccaddeshem, “The Lord your sanctifier” (Ex 31:13)

10. Jehovah-Nissi, “The Lord our banner” (Ex 17:15)

11. Jehovah-Rapha, “The Lord our healer” (Ex 15:26)

12. Jehovah-Rohi, “The Lord my shepherd” (Ps 23:1)

13. Jehovah-Sabbaoth, “The Lord of Hosts” (Is 6:1-3)

14. Jehovah-Shalom, “The Lord is peace” (Judg 6:24)

15. Jehovah-Shammah, “The Lord Who is present” (Ezek 48:35)

16. Jehovah-Tsidkenu, “The Lord our righteousness” (Jer 23:6)

Holy Trinity

1.    Father (YHWH)

2.    Son (Christ)

3.    Holy Spirit (Matt 28:19; 2 Cor 13:14)

What the Bible Says About Itself

1.    God wrote it. (2 Pet 1:19-21)

2.    Every word is inspired. (2 Tim 3:16-17)

3.    It will stand forever. (Is 40:8; Psa 119:89)

4.    Mankind is forbidden to alter it. (Deut 4:2; Rev 22:18-19)

5.    It always has an effect. (Is 55:11)

6.    It cleanses and purifies Christians. (Eph 5:25-27)

7.    The Bible is God’s written Word. Jesus is God’s living Word, the Word made flesh. (John 1:14)

Signs of the Times

1.    Scoffers (2 Pet 3:3-4)

2.    Apostasy (2 Tim 4:3)

3.    False Teachers (2 Pet 2:1-2)

4.    Spiritualism (1 Tim 4:1)

5.    Perilous Times (2 Tim 3:1-5)

6.    Heaped-up Treasure (James 5:1-6)

7.    Laodicean Church (Rev 3:14-22)

8.    Fig-Tree Sign (Matt 24:32-33)

Represents restoral of Israel to the land

9.    Distress of Nations (Luke 21:24-27)

10. As in the days of Noah (Luke 17:26-30)

Seven “I AM” Statements of Jesus

1.    I AM the bread of life. (John 6:35, 48)

2.    I AM the light of the world. (Jn 8:12, 9:5)

3.    I AM the door. (John 10:7)

4.    I AM the good shepherd. (Jn 10:11-14)

5.    I AM the resurrection and the life. (John 11:25)

6.    I AM the way, the truth and the life. (John 14:6)

7.    I AM the true vine. (John 15:1,5)

Titles of Christ

1.    Adam, last Adam (1 Cor 15:45)

2.    Alpha and Omega (Rev 21:6)

3.    Bread of Life (John 6:35)

4.    Chief Cornerstone (Eph 2:20)

5.    Chief Shepherd (1 Pet 5:4)

6.    Firstborn from the Dead (Col 1:18)

7.    Good Shepherd (John 10:11)

8.    Great Shepherd of the Sheep (Heb 13:20)

9.    High Priest (Heb 3:1)

10. Holy One of God (Mark 1:24)

11. Immanuel, God With Us (Matt 1:23)

12. King of Kings, Lord of Lords (Rev 19:16)

13. Lamb of God (John 1:29)

14. Light of the World (John 9:5)

15. Lion of Judah (Rev 5:5)

16. Lord of Glory (1 Cor 2:8)

17. Mediator between God and Men (1 Tim 2:5)

18. Only Begotten of the Father (John 1:14)

19. Prophet (Acts 3:22)

20. Savior (Luke 1:47)

21. Seed of Abraham (Gal 3:16)

22. Son of God (Mark 1:1)

23. Son of Man (Matt 18:11)

24. The Word (John 1:1)

Christ as Prophet, Priest and King

1.    Prophet (Deut 18:15; Matt 13:57)

First Advent

Corresponds to Magi’s gift of myrrh, which represents death

2.    Priest (Heb 6:20)

Corresponds to Magi’s gift of frankincense

Jesus is currently our High Priest

3.    King (Rev 17:14)

Second Advent

Corresponds to Magi’s gift of gold

Days of Creation

1.    Primeval Light (Gen 1:3-5)

2.    Firmament (Gen 1:6-8)

3.    Land (Gen 1:9-10)

Vegetation (Gen 1:11-13)

4.    Sun, moon, stars (Gen 1:14-19)

5.    Fish and fowl (Gen 1:20-23)

6.    Animals (Gen 1:24-25)

Man (Gen 1:26-31)

7.    Rest (Gen 2:2)

Tribes of Israel

1.    Reuben (Leah), He has seen my misery.

2.    Simeon (Leah), one who hears

3.    Levi* (Leah), attached

4.    Judah (Leah), praise

5.    Dan (Bilhah), He has vindicated

6.    Naphtali (Bilhah), my struggle

7.    Gad (Zilpah), good fortune

8.    Asher (Zilpah), happy

9.    Issachar (Leah), reward

10. Zebulun (Leah), honor

11. Joseph** (Rachel), may He add

a.    Ephraim, forget

b.    Mannasseh, twice faithful

12. Benjamin (Rachel), son of my right hand

*Levites are the priestly tribe, not one of the 12.

**Joseph’s sons each fathered one of the 12 tribes.

Plagues of Egypt

1.    Nile into blood (Ex 7:14-24)

2.    Frogs (Ex 8:1-15)

3.    Lice (Ex 8:16-19)

4.    Flies (Ex 8:20-32)

5.    Death of livestock / anthrax (Ex 9:1-7)

6.    Boils (Ex 9:8-12)

7.    Hail (Ex 9:13-35)

8.    Locusts (Ex 10:1-20)

9.    Darkness (Ex 10:21-29)

10. Death of the firstborn (Ex 11:1-10)

Beatitudes

1.    Blessed are the poor in spirit: for theirs is the kingdom of heaven. (Matt 5:3)

2.    Blessed are they that mourn: for they shall be comforted. (Matt 5:4)

3.    Blessed are the meek: for they shall inherit the earth. (Matt 5:5)

4.    Blessed are they which do hunger and thirst after righteousness: for they shall be filled. (Matt 5:6)

5.    Blessed are the merciful: for they shall obtain mercy. (Matt 5:7)

6.    Blessed are the pure in heart: for they shall see God. (Matt 5:8)

7.    Blessed are the peacemakers: for they shall be called the children of God. (Matt 5:9)

8.    Blessed are they which are persecuted for righteousness’ sake: for theirs is the kingdom of heaven. (Matt 5:10)

Petitions in Lord’s Prayer

Matthew 6:9-13

Address: Our Father which art in heaven.

1.    Hallowed be thy name.

2.    Thy kingdom come.

3.    Thy will be done in earth, as it is in heaven.

4.    Give us this day our daily bread.

5.    And forgive us our debts, as we forgive our debtors.

6.    And lead us not into temptation.

7.    But deliver us from evil.

Doxology: For thine is the Kingdom, and the power and the glory, for ever. Amen.

Arthur Pink, The Beatitudes and the Lord’s Prayer

Sayings on the Cross

1.    Father, forgive them, for they know not what they do. (Luke 23:34; Is 53:12)

2.    I tell you the truth, today you will be with me in paradise. (Luke 23:43; Is 53:12)

3.    (To his mother) Woman, here is your son. (To the disciple John) Here is your mother. (John 19:26-27)

4.    My God, my God, why have you forsaken me? (Matt 27:46; Ps 22:1)

5.    I thirst. (John 19:28; Ps 69:21)

6.    It is finished / tetelesti. (John 19:30)

Christ said these words at the exact moment the chief priest said them as the Passover lamb was slain in the temple. The Greek word tetelesti has the meaning “paid in full.”

7.    Father, into your hands I commit my spirit. (Luke 23:46; Ps 31:5)

Arthur Pink, The Seven Sayings of the Savior on the Cross

Feasts of the Lord

1.    Passover, Peschach (Ex 12:1-14; Lev 23:4-5), 14 Nisan

Death of firstborn in Egypt, Crucifixion

Represents redemption (1 Cor 5:7)

Passover cups:

a.    Cup of Thanksgiving

b.    Cup of Sanctification / Redemption

c.     Cup of Blessing

d.    Elijah’s Cup

2.    Unleavened Bread, Hag-Matzot (Ex 12:15-20; Lev 23:6-8) 15-21 Nisan

Represents holy walk (1 Cor 5:8)

3.    Firstfruits, Bikkurim (Lev 23:9-14), day after Unleavened Bread

Crossing of Red Sea, Jesus’ resurrection

Represents resurrection (1 Cor 15:22-23)

4.    Feast of Weeks, Pentecost, Shavout (Lev 23:15-22, Acts 2:1-4)

7 x 7 + 1 day after Firstfruits

Law given at Sinai, Holy Spirit given

5.    Trumpets, Rosh Hashanah (Lev 23:23-25), 1 Tishri

Regathering of Israel (Matt 24:29-31)

6.    Day of Atonement, Yom Kippur (Lev 23:26-32), 10 Tishri

Tribulation (Zech 13:1; Rom 11:26)

7.    Tabernacles, Feast of Booths, Sukkot (Lev 23:33-43), 15-22 Tishri (8 days)

Millennium (Amos 9:13-17; Zech 14:16-21)

All males were required to go to Jerusalem for Unleavened Bread, the Feast of Weeks, and the

Feast of Booths (Ex 23:14-19)

Additional feasts of Israel (not Feasts of the Lord)

Hannukah (25 Kislev, 8 days, John 10:22)

Purim (15 Adar, Esth 9-10, Matt 17:12)

Hayyim Schauss, The Jewish Festivals

Edward Chumney, The Seven Festivals of the Messiah

Offerings

1.    Burnt offering (Lev 1)

Represents acceptance (Heb 10:6-7)

2.    Meal / grain offering (Lev 2)

Represents dedication / consecration

3.    Peace / fellowship offering (Lev 3)

Represents reconciliation, fellowship

4.    Sin offering (Lev 4:1-5:13; Rom 8:3)

Represents propitiation (2 Cor 5:21)

5.    Trespass / guilt offering (Lev 5:14-6:7)

Represents repentance

Tabernacle

Outer Court, accessible by only one gate

1.    Bronze altar (Heb 10:10-12)

Represents Jesus, our burnt offering

2.    Bronze laver

Represents daily cleansing

Holy Place

3.    Table of shewbread (John 6:51)

Represents fellowship

4.    Golden lampstand, Menorah (Rev 4:5; John 1:9, 8:12; Rev. 21:22-23)

Represents Jesus, light of the world

5.    Golden altar of incense (Rev 5:8; 8:4)

Represents prayers of the saints

Veil (Matt 27:51, Heb 10:19-20)

Represents flesh

Holy of Holies

6.    Ark of the Covenant

Represents God’s law

7.    Mercy Seat (Heb 9:3-9)

Represents God’s grace (on top of Ark)

Ten Commandments

(Decalogue, or “Ten Words”)

1.    You shall have no other gods before me. (Ex 20:3)

2.    You shall not make for yourself a carved image. (Ex 20:4)

3.    You shall not take the name of the Lord your God in vain. (Ex 20:7)

4.    Remember the Sabbath, to keep it holy. (Ex 20:8)

5.    Honor your father and your mother. (Ex 20:12)

6.    You shall not murder. (Ex 20:13)

7.    You shall not commit adultery. (Ex 20:14)

8.    You shall not steal. (Ex 20:15)

9.    You shall not bear false witness. (Ex 20:16)

10. You shall not covet. (Ex 20:17)

Names of God

1.    Elohim, “Creator” (Gen 1:1)

2.    El-Elyon, “God Most High” (Gen 14:17-20)

3.    El-Olam, “Everlasting God” (Is 40:28-31)

4.    El-Roi, “Strong One Who Sees” (Gen 16:13)

5.    El-Shaddai, “God Almighty” (Gen 17:1)

6.    Adonai, “Lord Almighty” (Mal 1:6)

7.    Jehovah / YHWH (Gen 2:4)

8.    Jehovah-Jireh, “The Lord Will Provide” (Gen 22:14)

9.    Jehovah-Maccaddeshem, “The Lord your sanctifier” (Ex 31:13)

10.Jehovah-Nissi, “The Lord our banner” (Ex 17:15)

11.Jehovah-Rapha, “The Lord our healer” (Ex 15:26)

12.Jehovah-Rohi, “The Lord my shepherd” (Ps 23:1)

13.Jehovah-Sabbaoth, “The Lord of Hosts” (Is 6:1-3)

14.Jehovah-Shalom, “The Lord is peace” (Judg 6:24)

15.Jehovah-Shammah, “The Lord Who is present” (Ezek 48:35)

16.Jehovah-Tsidkenu, “The Lord our righteousness” (Jer 23:6)

Some Basic Principles

1.    Correct doctrine is important to God (2 Tim 4:3-4; Titus 2:1)

2.    We are entrusted with the secret things of God. We are stewards of His mysteries. (Psa 25:14;

1 Cor 4:1)

3.    Human knowledge is foolishness to God. (1 Cor . 3:19; Is 55:8)

4.    First mention. When something is unclear, study its first mention in Scripture.

5.    Nothing in Scripture is irrelevant. When things do not appear to make sense, there are treasures to be found.

Titles of Christ

1.    Adam, last Adam (1 Cor 15:45)

2.    Alpha and Omega (Rev 21:6)

3.    Bread of Life (John 6:35)

4.    Chief Cornerstone (Eph 2:20)

5.    Chief Shepherd (1 Pet 5:4)

6.    Firstborn from the Dead (Col 1:18)

7.    Good Shepherd (John 10:11)

8.    Great Shepherd of the Sheep (Heb 13:20)

9.    High Priest (Heb 3:1)

10.Holy One of God (Mark 1:24)

11.Immanuel, God With Us (Matt 1:23)

12.King of Kings, Lord of Lords (Rev 19:16)

13.Lamb of God (John 1:29)

14.Light of the World (John 9:5)

15.Lion of Judah (Rev 5:5)

16.Lord of Glory (1 Cor 2:8)

17.Mediator between God and Men (1 Tim 2:5)

18.Only Begotten of the Father (John 1:14)

19.Prophet (Acts 3:22)

20.Savior (Luke 1:47)

21.Seed of Abraham (Gal 3:16)

22.Son of God (Mark 1:1)

23.Son of Man (Matt 18:11)

24.The Word (John 1:1)

Beatitudes

1.    Blessed are the poor in spirit: for theirs is the kingdom of heaven. (Matt 5:3)

2.    Blessed are they that mourn: for they shall be comforted. (Matt 5:4)

3.    Blessed are the meek: for they shall inherit the earth. (Matt 5:5)

4.    Blessed are they which do hunger and thirst after righteousness: for they shall be filled. (Matt 5:6)

5.    Blessed are the merciful: for they shall obtain mercy. (Matt 5:7)

6.    Blessed are the pure in heart: for they shall see God. (Matt 5:8)

7.    Blessed are the peacemakers: for they shall be called the children of God. (Matt 5:9)

8.    Blessed are they which are persecuted for righteousness’ sake: for theirs is the kingdom of heaven. (Matt 5:10)

Wills of God

1.    Decretive Will / Secret Will

2.    Revealed Will / Perceptive Will

3.    Permissive Will

 Petitions in Lord’s Prayer   Matthew 6:9-13

Address: Our Father which art in heaven.

1.    Hallowed be thy name.

2.    Thy kingdom come.

3.    Thy will be done in earth, as it is in heaven.

4.    Give us this day our daily bread.

5.    And forgive us our debts, as we forgive our debtors.

6.    And lead us not into temptation.

7.    But deliver us from evil.

Doxology: For thine is the Kingdom, and the power and the glory, for ever. Amen.

Sayings on the Cross

1.    Father, forgive them, for they know not what they do. (Luke 23:34; Is 53:12)

2.    I tell you the truth, today you will be with me in paradise. (Luke 23:43; Is 53:12)

3.    (To his mother) Woman, here is your son. (To the disciple John) Here is your mother. (John 19:26-27)

4.    My God, my God, why have you forsaken me? (Matt 27:46; Ps 22:1)

5.    I thirst. (John 19:28; Ps 69:21)

6.    It is finished / tetelesti . (John 19:30) Christ said these words at the exact moment the chief priest said them as the Passover lamb was slain in the temple. The Greek word tetelesti has the meaning “paid in full.”

7.    Father, into your hands I commit my spirit. (Luke 23:46; Ps 31:5)

Persons Recorded as Having Been Raised from the Dead

1.    Widow of Zarephath’s son, by Elijah (1 Kings 17:22)

2.    Shunammite woman’s son, by Elisha (2 Kings 4:34,35)

3.    Man raised when he came into contact with Elisha’s bones (2 Kings 13:20,21)

4.    Widow of Nain’s son, by Jesus (Luke 7:14,15)

5.    Jairus’ daughter, by Jesus (Luke 8:52-56)

6.    Lazarus, by Jesus after 3 days (John 11)

7.    Jesus (Matt 28:6; Acts 2:24)

8.    Many holy people in tombs when Jesus gave up his spirit (Matt 27:52)

9.    Dorcas, by Peter (Acts 9:40)

10.Eutychus, by Paul (Acts 20:9-12)

Note: Jonah was in the belly of a great fish for 3 days and 3 nights. A strong case can be made that this was also a death and resurrection. (Jonah 1:17-2:10)

Paradoxes of a Child of God

“For though he was crucified through weakness, yet he liveth by the power of God. For we also are weak in him, but we shall live with him by the power of God toward you.” II Corinthians 13:4

Strong enough to be weak; Successful enough to fail; Busy enough to take time; Wise enough to say, “I don’t know.” Serious enough to laugh; Rich enough to be poor; Right enough to say “I’m wrong;” Compassionate enough to discipline; Conservative enough to give freely; Mature enough to be childlike; Righteous enough to be a sinner; Important enough to be last; Courageous enough to fear God; Planned enough to be spontaneous; Controlled enough to be flexible; Free enough to endure captivity; Knowledgeable enough to ask questions; Loving enough to be angry; Great enough to be anonymous; Responsible enough to play; Assured enough to be rejected; Stable enough to cry; Victorious enough to lose; Industrious enough to relax; Leading enough to serve.

The 9 Gifts and the 9 Fruits

 

Gifts of the Spirit 1 Corinthians 12


  1. Word of Wisdom
  2. Word of Knowledge
  3. Faith
  4. Healings
  5. Working of Miracles
  6. Prophesy
  7. Discerning of Spirits
  8. Different Kinds of Tongues
  9. Interpretation of Tongues

    Fruits of the Spirit Galatians 5:22-23


  1. Love
  2. Joy
  3. Peace
  4. Longsuffering
  5. Kindness
  6. Goodness
  7. Faithfulness
  8. Gentleness
  9. Self Control
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